Schunnemunk State Park – Schunnemunk Mountain

Park Site

Trail Map

Hike Distance:  8.23 miles

Trails:  Trestle (White), Barton Swamp (Red dot), Jessup (Yellow), Dark Hollow (Black dot), Otterkill (Red)

My Map:

It’s election day and my company gave me the day off to vote.  The joke’s on them, I voted three weeks ago.  So, with all the rain this past weekend, I planned on hiking today as the weather was supposed to be better.  It started out nice at home, by the time I reached the trailhead and parking lot on Otterkill Road, it was cloudy and there was a smattering of rain drops on my windshield.  By the end of the day the sun was out and it was gorgeous.  The wind was blustery, and at the top it was downright howling, especially in the exposed areas.

I started by heading up the Trestle trail, aptly named as it starts into the woods under the MTA train trestle.  On the way, I took this picture of what I would be doing very shortly.

I started out with a jacket on as I wasn’t entirely shore if I would get soaked.  And the trail heads steeply up.  By the time I reached Sharon’s Bench, I took the jacket off.

Sharon’s Bench, with the Gunks in front of the Catskils

The trail kept climbing until it got onto the ridge.

Smooth Rock Tripe

There was lots and lots of puddingstone.

Once onto the ridge, there are lots of views in all directions.

After a short walk, you’ll run into cairns; which is where the Barton Swamp trail meets the Trestle Trail.  Hang a left, then head downhill.  For my entire trip, most of the difficult scrambles were in the downhill direction; and made worse by the large amount of leaf litter.  Yes, I slipped a couple of times.  This picture will give some idea of what the downhill scrambles look like.

 

Winter Russula

Barton Swamp heads down (with extensive scrambling) into a valley where it comes to Baby Creek.

After crossing the creek, you’ll head uphill to the junction with the Jessup trail.  This climbs onto the ridge of Schunnemunk Mountail, with views-a-plenty.

Did I mention puddingstone?

I wonder what this is?
Eastern Teaberry

Before reaching the ridgeline, there was a viewpoint where I could look across to the western ridge – looking across the valley I had just traversed.

When I got onto the top of the ridge, the wind really picked up.  And while I wasn’t above tree-line, there was a little exposure here.  Much of the walking was on huge, long, flat puddingstone rocks; almost like walking on a roadway.  At least the sun had finally come out and took the bite off the wind.  I got as close as I could to the top of Schunnemunk Mountain.

From here I retraced my steps to the Dark Hollow trail; which would be my descent off the mountain.  You could almost skateboard on some of the sections of rock.

The Dark Hollow trail is one continuous descent.  There were lots of rock scrambles, one with water pouring from it (tough to see in this picture.)

Here’s a shot looking back up.  Treacherous, with all the leaves on the trail.

Also, there would be numerous stream crossings, many of the streams were too deep to rockhop.

And what do we have here?

I wasn’t sure, until I checked here (scroll down until you get a match.)

To my eyes, it looks like Bobcat.  I certainly wasn’t prepared for that.

There are a couple of nice viewpoints coming down Dark Hollow.

The trail junctions with the Otterkill trail at the railroad tracks.  DO NOT CROSS the tracks.  At this point most of the uphill/downhill is over, and the Otterkill is more of a woods road.  There will be some small climbs, but it is a good way to finish the day.

You cross a small stream

before eventually crossing Baby Creek again, this time over a bridge.

Bracket Fungi
Oyster Mushroom
Eastern Wintergreen
Asian Beauty

There is one last viewpoint on the Otterkill trail before it meets back up with the Trestle Trail.

This was a great hike and it turned into a great day.  It felt great with the sun out, and the wind was bearable.  The trails are fairly well marked, there are only a couple of spots I had to really look around.  On the large puddingstone rocks on top of the ridge, there are cairns to keep you from getting off trail, and painted arrows on the rocks when there are turns.  What was nice is I only ran into one other hike the entire day.  Though, there are signs along Otterkill road warning not to park on the sides – so I suspect it’s pretty busy on the weekends.  All in all, a great day.

Ticks:  0

Bobcat:  Well, I didn’t see one, I saw where one was.

Blazes:

Hiked:  11/3/2020

Bear Mountain State Park – Major Welch Trail and the Appalachian Trail

Park Site

Trail Map

Distance:  3.6 Miles

Trails – Major Welch going up, Appalachian Trail coming down

Map:

This hike has been on my list for a while.  What’s interesting is that I remember going by the park when I was little when we would visit my grandparents.  We would take the Palisades Parkway to the Bear Mountain bridge, cross, and take 9D up.  But, it’s been a long long time since I had been up this way.  Leaving the house a little after 8:00, skies were clear, the sun was out, and it was the middle 70s.  When I got to the park, it was already in the middle 80s.  My plan of attack was to go up the Major Welch as I had heard that there was some rock scrambling on the way up.  Oh, there was.  Just look at the map:  after you go by the lake, and turn off the paved trail, you can see how many contour lines I crossed in a short amount of time.

A little foreshadowing:

I’m pretty sure this guy was circling overhead when I was part way through the rocks.  I think he was just getting a count of how many walked by so he could triage lunch.

Some shots of walking by Hessian Lake:

It was walking on pavement around the lake.  Make sure the lake is immediately to your right – the trail head isn’t the most intuitive.

Here’s where the trail leaves the pavement and the lake.  Read the sign.  That’s the longest 1.5 miles I think I’ve ever walked.  Of course, I started to blow through the rocks when I left the pavement – it wasn’t that bad.

There were some (short) sections that were pretty flat.

There were lots and lots of those stairs.  And yes, they took a toll.

After an immediate left turn, the fun began.  I like rock scrambling as much as the next guy; but wow, this went on for a while – or so it seemed/felt.  These next pictures just don’t do it justice.  There were multiple sections of these immense boulders to scramble up.  And in the heat, it got tiring.

I only managed two pictures.  There were more sections.  At this point there were three or four groups of us leap frogging each other as we passed through the scrambles.  At one point, though, a young woman came RUNNING by us.  She blew by us like we were standing still (we were.)  Just before the top, the trail crosses Perkins Drive, and it’s a nice place to stop and get a drink.  The groups I was with all commented on how someone was RUNNING up that trail.

After crossing the road, and one more scramble, the trail flattens for a bit.

Don’t be surprised at the top, Perkins  Drive stops at the fire tower for people to picnic.  The looks I got when I came out of the woods were priceless.  Probably the best part, there was a soda machine selling  Powerade, maybe the best $3 I have ever spent.  I had plenty of water, but I needed something else.

I looked at the fire tower for a good ten minutes.  After coming up that grueling trail, did I really want to climb the steps to the top to see the view?  No.  But when was I coming back – so of course I climbed.  And I’ll admit, the view was nice.  Supposedly, you could see four states from the top.  But I needed to eat, and finish that Powerade.

My eating rock:

After a good long rest, it was down the Appalachian Trail.

Don’t kid yourself.  Yes, it’s crushed gravel, all the way down – a welcome respite from what I climbed going up.  However, there are a ton of stairs cut out of rock – which I really appreciate – but takes its toll on the way down.

There were a couple of viewpoints on the way down:

To give you an idea on the stairs, I took this picture looking back:

It’s really impressive how this portion of the Appalachian Trail was built.  And, when you reach the bottom, there are interpretive displays on building the trail, and some of the features that make up a trail.  I highly recommend stopping to see the displays.

Another great hike, though if I were to plan it again, I would wait until the temperatures have dropped a bit.  Be prepared when doing this hike.  Bring plenty of water (though there are vending machines at the top.)  And know that the rock scrambling truly is strenuous.  My final verdict:  I loved it, I’ll pay the price tomorrow, but it will be worth it.  One final note: the park was PACKED with people, so get there early.  I didn’t have a problem at 10:00 when I arrived, but I suspect parking would be a premium much after that.  (Side note, it was $10 to get in the park.)

Ticks: 0

(A new feature I’ll add going forward)

Blazes:

Major Welch:

Appalachian Trail:

(Missing:  the piece of the trail at the top, around the fire tower.  Markers had the Major Welch red circle above the AT white blaze.)

Hiked:  7/28/2019